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EcommerceBytes-NewsFlash, Number 3120 - July 31, 2013 - ISSN 1539-5065    3 of 4

Good Eggs Beats Walmart, Amazon, to New Orleans Grocery Ecommerce

By David A. Utter
EcommerceBytes.com
July 31, 2013




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Two of the biggest names in retailing, Walmart and Amazon, both have online grocery shopping initiatives taking place in select parts of the country. Walmart has been testing grocery delivery in Northern California, while Amazon rolled out Amazon Fresh in the Los Angeles area.

Choosing population-dense areas with higher income households makes sense for such testing, but naturally leaves out other equally deserving test markets around the country. When these two retail giants get around to looking at someplace like New Orleans, a food city if one ever existed, they may find a little competitive surprise.

The Times-Picayune noted how ecommerce grocer Good Eggs has expanded from its California and New York markets to open Good Eggs New Orleans. Simone Reggie, cited in the article, said the Good Eggs company "wanted a more mixed income city," leading them to start their third location in the Big Easy.

The operation connects shoppers with local businesses producing meats, dairy, and other grocery items. Customers can get items shipped to them from the businesses, or order from multiple providers and have those orders assembled and delivered by Good Eggs.

Food-related ecommerce in New Orleans could be on the cusp of a renaissance, with regards to certain other consumables. The report noted Louisiana's Cottage Food Law takes effect on August 1st. This will allow the sale of cakes and cookies, and some jarred items like jams and honey, to be sold direct from the producer to the customer.

An annual sales limit of $20,000 for these solo operations will keep them limited in scope. However, it seems likely some of these sellers will seek out ways to easily market and sell what they make, and ecommerce is well-suited for this potential market.

About the author:

David A. Utter is a freelance writer based in Lexington, KY. He has covered technology topics from search to security to online business and has been quoted in places like ZDNet and BusinessWeek. He considers his appearance on NPR's "All Things Considered" with long-time host Robert Siegel a delightful highlight. Send your tips to media@davidautter.com and find him on Twitter @davidautter and on LinkedIn.

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