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EcommerceBytes-NewsFlash, Number 2533 - May 02, 2011 - ISSN 1539-5065    1 of 5

Google Strikes Marketplace from Product Search for Non-Compliant Items

By Kenneth Corbin
EcommerceBytes.com
May 02, 2011




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Google has removed listings from the marketplace iOffer from its Product Search pages, claiming that the site has numerous items that do not comply with the policies of the Google Product Search program.

The change means that, at least temporarily, Google will no longer accept feeds from iOffer.

A reader forwarded to AuctionBytes the following message from Google regarding the delisting of iOffer:

"Marketplaces will be required to manage the submission of all items to Product Search from any of their sellers, and must have a history of compliance with our Google Base Program Policies. While evaluating marketplaces, we found that iOffer has a significant number of non-compliant items. Therefore, we are currently not accepting items from this marketplace."

The removal of iOffer comes as the latest effort on the part of the search giant to tidy up its ecommerce offerings. In 2009, for instance, Google discontinued individual sellers' accounts, consolidating its feeds into multi-client accounts for aggregators and marketplaces.

"Our goal is to help users find merchants that offer excellent shopping experiences," Google spokeswoman Jeannie Hornung told AuctionBytes. "We may suspend the accounts of merchants that we believe may not meet commonly accepted minimum standards as outlined in our Google Product Search Policies."

Hornung declined to provide details on the non-compliant items on iOffer's marketplace, saying only, "We don't comment on specific merchants."

A representative from iOffer did not respond to a request for comment.

Google enumerates a detailed set of compliance standards in its program policies. Google bars listings for items whose prices fluctuate, for instance, which means that items such as airline tickets are off limits, as are any form of auction sales.

Additionally, Google has a rigid policy against duplicate listings. "There is a strict "one item, one owner" policy," the terms state. "As the owner, you may only submit one listing per item, no matter if you own multiple websites."

About the Author
Kenneth Corbin is a freelance writer based in Washington, D.C. He has written on politics, technology and other subjects for more than four years, most recently as the Washington correspondent for InternetNews.com, covering Congress, the White House, the FCC and other regulatory affairs. He can be found on LinkedIn here .

About the author:

Kenneth Corbin is a freelance writer based in Washington, D.C. He has written on politics, technology and other subjects since 2007, most recently as the Washington correspondent for InternetNews.com, covering Congress, the White House, the FCC and other regulatory affairs. He can be found on LinkedIn here.

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