728_header.jpg (23748 bytes)
 Home 
 EB Blog 
 AB Blog 
 Letters 
 Podcasts 
 Forums 
 EPIS 
 Classifieds 
 EKG 
 Ratings 
EcommerceBytes-NewsFlash, Number 2231 - February 25, 2010 - ISSN 1539-5065    4 of 4

Blogger Captures eBay Motors Scam on YouTube Video

By Ina Steiner
EcommerceBytes.com
February 25, 2010




Email This Story to a Friend

The eBayMotorsSucks blog, written by former eBay Motors seller Ed Koon, published a video on February 18 that shows an eBay Motors listing redirecting to an off-eBay site. He wrote, "Watch as this 2007 Chevy Tahoe listing sweeps me off of eBay to a hacked website." He refers to a well known redirect scam that AuctionBytes has covered and was documented by US-CERT.

It's a compelling video, and Mr. Koon told us he has talked to at least one recent victim of such the scam. We asked eBay abut Mr. Koon's video, and spokesperson Johnna Hoff provided the following statement:

eBay Motors is constantly and proactively monitoring the site to prevent and address possible fraudulent behavior. As part of this monitoring, eBay Motors has identified recent redirect issues and has implemented specific safety measures, including updating our detection systems with a filter to identify this particular behavior. These additional protections should supplement smart shopping habits, including reviewing seller ratings, communicating with sellers and confirming transaction details through My eBay before making a purchase, and never paying for a vehicle via instant cash-transfer methods. eBay Motors also offers free vehicle history reports and a Vehicle Purchase Protection program for transactions that occur on the site, to help ensure the 10 million visitors coming to the site each month interact in a safe, trusted marketplace.

Mr. Koon believes the redirect vulnerability should be an easy fix, and said he first started logging eBay redirect issues in 2006. "There are still many buyers getting scammed on vehicles. They always seem to find out after the fact that eBay VPP does not guarantee vehicles and hold money for sellers like escrow. The first thing buyers should ask themselves is, why is this vehicle with a book value of $40,000 selling for 12,500? If it's too cheap to be for real it's a scam! Wizen up folks!"


Related Stories
Survey Reveals New Security Measures eBay May Be Considering - November 01, 2010

eBay Data Accessed by Fraudster, AP Reports - September 24, 2010

eBay Seller Pleads Guilty to Counterfeit Trafficking - September 15, 2010

eBay and Western Union Favored by Spoofing Cyber Criminals - September 13, 2010

PayPal Addresses Fraud Involving Unauthorized iTunes Payments - August 26, 2010

About the author:

Ina Steiner is co-founder and Editor of EcommerceBytes and has been reporting on ecommerce since 1999. She's a widely cited authority on marketplace selling and is author of "Turn eBay Data Into Dollars" (McGraw-Hill 2006). Her blog was featured in the book, "Blogging Heroes" (Wiley 2008). Follow her on Twitter at @ecommercebytes and send news tips to ina@ecommercebytes.com.

You may quote up to 50 words of any article on the condition that you attribute the article to EcommerceBytes.com and either link to the original article or to www.EcommerceBytes.com.
All other use is prohibited.


Email This Story to a Friend
Email this story to a friend.


4 of 4