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Ina Steiner EcommerceBytes Blog
News and insight focusing on ecommerce.
by Ina Steiner, Editor of EcommerceBytes.com
Wed Dec 12 2012 14:02:00

What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript

By: Ina Steiner
Sponsored Link
eBay's Director of Seller Protections Rich Matsuura joined me yesterday to talk about eBay's Seller Protection Program and how eBay protects sellers from bad buyers. You can listen to the podcast on the Ecommerce Industry Soundbytes podcast, a transcript of the interview follows - please feel free to post your comments below.

Ina Steiner: I've published a post on the EcommerceBytes Blog asking readers what questions they had for you, and not surprisingly, people had lots of questions. There were six pages of questions.

I'd like to get through as many points as we can fit in this interview. I wanted to start off by asking you if there are any plans to change eBay's seller protection program or to change anything about the feedback system?


Rich Matsuura: Let me tell you what we're doing right now and about some of the changes we have. One change that is coming up in the near future, and you've probably seen the announcement about this already in the last seller release, is about a claims process.

We are moving to a world where we are going to require buyers to contact sellers prior to making a claim. Now, we strongly encourage it, encourage them to do the process of the buyers giving up that claim, but because that communication can happen outside of eBay, we often have to take the buyer's word for it that they contacted the seller.

So now we're going to require the buyer to contact the seller through the member to member communication. We're going to know the contact happened. That's one of the changes that will take place.

The other one, during that same change, we will no longer be counting the open cases against a seller, only those where there was a strike against the seller. So we're making some changes coming up in buyer protection.

I'd say a lot of the changes that we're making happen on the backend. We've been doing quite a bit this year to start removing the bad buyers off of the site.

I always have a caveat before going into this piece - I know most of your listeners are sellers who have been on the platform for some time. I do want to call out that most of our transactions on the platform go really well. I think we do have a really good community of both buyers and sellers. And when we do have one or two new sellers on the platform who might be listening to this podcast, I don't want to, I don't want to turn this conversation turn into "We have a lot of bad buyers and this happens all the time."

We've been researching this; we've been looking into this; most of the buyers on the site are good. But we do know there are buyers out there who are taking advantage of the system. They're taking advantage of the fact that we do use feedback and DSRs, the inner standards program and they do know we have a buyer protection program, and they're using that against us. There are folks who are distorting feedback and they're folks who are saying, give me free shipping or I'm going to give you a negative feedback, or give me a partial refund,...

Ina Steiner: There were a lot of questions about bad buyers. Maybe we could cover some of that. One of the questions that I thought was really interesting was, what actually constitutes feedback extortion?

Rich Matsuura: Feedback extortion right now, it needs to be fairly clear, inside of the messages, between the buyer and the seller. The buyer would leave negative feedback or a low DSR unless the seller complies.

One of the things were absolutely doing is looking at our feedback policies and making sure that our feedback policies are clear. There is probably some room for improvement on some of the areas we could be looking at, this is something we're absolutely going to be looking at next year - feedback policies and where removals make sense.

But right now it does have to be a pretty clear case of the feedback or the message itself being pretty clear that "If you don't do this, I'm going to leave you a negative feedback."

Ina Steiner: It's a lot more subtle than that.

One of the questions on buyer behavior was about, why not have immediate suspension for a buyer who circumvents the blocked bidder list? Is there any way - eBay knows if a particular User ID has multiple User IDs and is circumventing the blocked bidder list, but the seller has no way to know that. Have you ever thought about doing something around that?


Rich Matsuura: We do take action against folks who are circumventing the blocked bidder list. The one thing that, and this is another area we're absolutely improving - we've made good progress in 2012 - we have made, if you go back to what we call account linking, where we know that this person is from the same account, or multiple users from the same person.

We have done quite a bit on the seller side, because sellers need to give us quite a bit of information when they're setting up their account. To be able to make those connections.

On the buyer side we have less of that information in a lot of cases. So we've been making some good progress on being able to link those accounts. We're moving further along for us to be able to take those actions when it's not just blocked bidder list but if a person has been suspended before.

Ina Steiner: Right. Let me ask you about this because sometimes the seller is in the front line and he or she is dealing with a particular buyer, and experienced sellers know that there's something going on. I just had someone recently who wrote me and said, I know that there's a buyer who has multiple accounts and they're doing this behavior, but when I call customer service,... a lot of people are just frustrated dealing with customer service.

I kind of want to take a step back and say to you: You're in charge of seller protection. But there's one thing to have policies, but when the sellers actually call in to try to resolve something or report someone or try to get some kind of satisfaction or answers, sometimes they're stymied.

Do you see, is there any way of fixing that disconnect between what you are intending for the protection of sellers versus what the seller has to deal with when dealing with customer service reps? What do you think about that?


Rich Matsuura: I think going into next year this is a big opportunity for eBay. This is something where, the first thing I want to say around our customer support group, we have been making some really good progress over this past two or three years to build up this customer support organization - to provide more phone support, and email support, and to really get out there with getting more training.

I'm in Salt Lake City today, visiting their customer support organization. It's a fantastic group of folks. They know a ton about eBay and the site. This is part of the problem that we run into.

I'm going to acknowledge another point which is, I think we can absolutely get better here, especially from a seller protection perspective. We ask our reps to know a lot. We ask the agents to know a lot of rules and nuances out of those rules, and we need to, and I'm taking this on my team's side, we need to train and better train across the board folks in customer support so you get a consistent answer and you get the right answer when it comes to seller protection.

One of the primary reasons I'm out here is just this: making sure we get the right training get out, to make sure we get the right information distributed across so there is, not just here in Salt Lake, there are a lot of reps we need to get trained on this, but making sure we're getting that consistent feedback back to our sellers.

Because I hear the feedback, and I've read through the first five and a half pages (of the EcommerceBytes Blog post), I think to the beginning of page six on your comments section, and I saw this, and I hear this when we get out in the community. We've been getting out to the different events and meetups and hearing that customer support is a frustration point. And it's been so when it comes to seller protection. It's something we're taking on, and some time next year when we're talking again, We're hearing that it's getting better, not this ____ that it was before, because we're looking to get it even better than we have in the past.

Ina Steiner: Right, and it sounds like sometimes the customer service reps, sometimes they say, they got a great customer service rep but it was just coming back to the policies themselves. So in terms of DSRs, that was a big area of concern.

One of the biggest things I think people are wondering is, why can't sellers see the DSR scores and to give it historical perspective, they were rolled out when sellers were able to give buyers negative feedback. eBay rolled this out as a way for buyers to feel comfortable leaving honest feedback. But now that there are no negative ramifications, is there any talk about bringing transparency to DSRs?


Rich Matsuura: I'd say there are still negative ramifications to exposing who leaves that negative DSR score. This goes back a few years now but one of the other primary reasons feedback or DSRs were anonymous was that it gave us a more accurate picture of, or more accurate feedback from the buyer. Buyers were apt to leave more accurate feedback when that feedback was anonymous. For us to maintain this getting accurate signal - eBay had not been able to see well into the transactions. It's well into the, these are the top four points we're hearing from buyers, they're having frustrations with areas that eBay needed to get better on -

Ina Steiner: You raise an interesting point. Now that eBay is charging final value fees on shipping costs, they do have transparency into (it). eBay knows if a seller says, the shipping cost is $5, and then eBay sees that they have charged the buyer $5, then why is the buyer then able to say, that was too much? And I'm going to ding DSR on shipping cost.

Rich Matsuura: There are two parts to this answer. On the one part, there are still areas of eBay where we have, and I'll call it - it's a term we used to use quite a bit before, and I'm glad we're not having to use it as often - but there's still areas of eBay where we have an excessive shipping problem.

You're right, we've removed a lot of the barriers around, a lot of the incentives for sellers to be charging excessive shipping. But it still exists. When buyers we're paying high shipping costs, this is one of the reasons why it hurt their trust. It actually hurt their future buying activity on the site, and that's why it became one of the four DSR scores, one of the primary DSR scores we are looking at when we are rating sellers and looking for feedback from our buyers.

Are we getting to a world where we have more information? I'd say absolutely. In a world where, if you go back a few years, we didn't have, we didn't require shipping costs to be on the list. We weren't seeing a lot of shipping cost information. We didn't even have the ability to have tracking information. There's a lot that we didn't have in the past. So as we're looking at what else can we improve on the feedback system I'd say getting more objective is something we're absolutely looking at. There's a team at eBay that's looking at what we can do to make things better there.

Feedback is, the complexity here is pretty integral and printed deep into our ecosystem so we need to make changes carefully. But we're absolutely looking at what do we need to do to make feedback more accurate, more objective, looking into quite a bit there. There's a feedback team at eBay that's looking into that.

Ina Steiner: I would say one of the things I'm hearing, and I'm not sure how widespread this is, but I hear once in a while from people who say they've gotten low DSRs because they're a small seller. I believe it's a year for them (before those scores roll off).

They sort of live under this cloud of, oh my gosh, I got a low DSR, it's affecting my discounts, my status, and most importantly, my visibility in search, and they're told, just hang in there, just wait for the year to go, and those DSRs will roll up.

I hear from those sellers once in a while that they never do have that opportunity. They're somehow so limited because they're pushed down in search results and they can't get enough sales and ultimately they just fail, they just can't get over that low rating. Are you aware of those kinds of issues, and what's your response?


Rich Matsuura: We do hear that once in a while. We hear more often though sellers, and a lot of these, you're right, they are the lower volume sellers. They have their feedback on for a year, so they're under the 400 for the three months, and we do hear quite often that a number of sellers are able to get their way back into top rated seller status, continuing to sell items by continuing to provide that good level of service to their customers.

But when we're talking about the top-rated seller program, we do work fairly closely with the top rated seller team. The philosophy on the top rated seller team is, these are the sellers who can provide this top experience inside of eBay. They do have some strict standards for what they need to meet to stay at that top rating. And for us to get an accurate signal into are they providing a good customer experience you do need a certain number of transactions to get through, which is why we'll stand there for a year, we're looking to make sure there's enough transactions there to make an accurate picture of how is this seller performing on the site. And that's why we have a longer look back period there.

We're always working with the top rated seller team to see what's the future of the top rated seller program looks like and what are these look backs. We're working with them from a policy perspective, and the philosophy there is, you need to have enough transactions for us to make an accurate picture and make sure the folks we're promoting and giving that promise back to our buyers, that they are giving a top rated experience. That's the primary reason we have that stringent standard there.

Ina Steiner: And another question I saw that was somewhat parallel: Readers are saying that buyers are only leaving seller feedback if they're dissatisfied, not all of them, but that's a growing trend, that buyers won't leave feedback unless they're unhappy.

Some of the questions were, if a buyer doesn't file and will leave feedback in a certain time frame, why not automatically give the seller five stars for the transaction because? If they were unhappy they would have given the feedback.


Rich Matsuura: That's actually a good point. The way we're calculating our standards program today versus when you go back a couple of years ago, that's pretty much what we're doing. Because we're looking at your number of low DSRs compared to your number of transactions, we're essentially calculating on the back end as though those were five star transactions. So we're making the assumption now, and this is different from when we had an average score before, when kind of back into the 4.8 days, and the 4.6 days, compared to those days now, this is exactly the way that it happened.

And the way we calculate it on the back end, I think as a seller, be happy that you don't get a feedback, because essentially when we calculate it, it's the same as five stars. That's the way we calculate today, and that's already happening.

Ina Steiner: OK. What is, to get back to the bad buyers, I don't know what percentage, it may be a very minor small percentage, but when they do exist, they have a big effect as you can see with DSRs and so on.

I want to make sure I get this question in there: What is eBay doing to identify bad buyers? And once identified, what are you doing about them?


Rich Matsuura:
We've stepped up this program dramatically over the last year, and are continuing to step it up over the next year. We have a trust science team at eBay, a whole bunch of really smart guys, PhDs, and these guys create these algorithms. These guys are looking at every transaction that happens on the site. They're looking at buyers' histories. They're looking at a number of variables, something in the neighborhood of a couple hundred variables they're looking at, to identify when something is going bad, or when a buyer is being abusive - everything from, somebody is getting too many returns, or too many partial refunds.

They're also looking deep into that member to member communication. An interesting story that came up fairly recently was a buyer who was being really polite in all her member to member communications but they were essentially, it was around this musical instrument, they were writing the same text to three different sellers saying that there was something wrong and they were looking for a partial refund. And they're getting these partial refunds, and sellers were extremely apologetic, and this was a world where, they couldn't see that this was happening to more than one seller.

eBay was able to identify that, and then we suspended that person. We've been, let's go back to, the other things we identify, let's call them the picky buyers. The buyers who are leaving a lot more negative feedback than they should be leaving. We're looking at the folks and partial refunds are a big red flag for us, somebody who is getting a lot of partial refunds, which could also point to that pickiness. A lot of different types of behavior that we're looking at.

And then your question, well what do we do when we identify them? We're doing a couple of things depending on how egregious the behavior is. On one end, we're trying to rehabilitate them. We see this a lot with unpaid items. A lot of new buyers come in, they don't pay for their item, but they're very "rehabilitatable." We send them the educational information, we give them a call, and we help them.

Sometimes eBay is not the easiest place to purchase, especially for a new buyer, and we help them along. We see a lot of them rehabilitate, and we see a lot of them turn into good buyers going forward.

Then you've got the other end of the spectrum where it looks pretty egregious. Here's another example: they're looking at competitive sellers. You're a competitive seller in this category and you leave negative feedback, and you're doing this a couple of times. That's looking pretty bad for us. We will suspend those folks pretty quickly.

If we're getting reports from sellers that they're getting a brick in the box as a return, that's pretty egregious. These things that are outright fraud and these are people we don't want on the site, we're suspending them, and we're just getting rid of them altogether.

When we take these different actions, and there are areas in the middle where we can warn the buyer and we can say, we're watching you, if we even warn a buyer, we look back at all of the feedback they have left, their low DSRs, their negative and neutrals, we look at the claims they have filed, and we re-score all of those from all of the sellers they had interacted with. As soon as they get that warning, we are making the assumption that person is suspect. And it's a person whose feedback does not bring the credibility we want in the system, so we take it all out of the system.

Ina Steiner: That was going to be a follow up question. So what you're saying is, once you do identify someone who has problematic buying behavior, you do go back and remove negatives and DSRs?

Rich Matsuura: Everything. We remove all the negatives, all the low DSR scores, and the claims from all of the sellers they had previously interacted with.

Ina Steiner: Well, this message isn't really getting out there. eBay is a very quantitative company. You measure everything. Why not provide some statistics to sellers in a seller newsletter or through our publication where you say, here's our performance over time.

Because you're demanding that sellers adhere to standards and they're doing the best they can, but eBay, are you guys getting better? We have no idea. We're still seeing complaints, it's anecdotal. You guys have the numbers. Why not get your message out, look we've tried, we're now better able to identify. Isn't there any way of communicating that without sending the wrong message to buyers or looking bad?


Rich Matsuura:
I don't think I'm as concerned about sending the wrong message to buyers. To a certain degree I want buyers to know we're doing this. That this behavior is not going to be tolerated.

I think you make a really good callout here, which is, and this is me talking to you here is the first of us getting the seller protection message out, that we're doing something, and there's a team that cares about our sellers. We haven't done a good job around touting our successes, because we have some successes, and we need to pull those together and make sure Ryan and folks are good with it, but there's a really good story we can share and I would love to keep on having these conversations with you and give you progress reports.

Because you're right, we don't communicate that very well. One of the things we're, and we've started this recently, is that, when we do remove that feedback from our seller's account, to start letting them know we're doing that. So we start sending out monthly emails. When we remove that feedback, sellers should be getting emails telling them that we removed the feedback.

We're also trying to show it on the seller dashboard, information about the feedback numbers removed during that month. We're trying to get more proactive with what we're sharing, but you're right, we have a long ways to go there.

Ina Steiner: I have a couple more specific questions I'm going to try to squeeze in here. Sellers have asked for more empowerment. Blocked bidder is a powerful tool for them. But they want more features added to it.

Somebody said, how about giving the ability for sellers to block buyers with more than two negatives in the last year or those who have returned more than two items in the last year, and to add the number of claims or the percentage of claims filed during a period of time, and let them block that buyer. What do you think about those kinds of suggestions.


Rich Matsuura: Glad those suggestions are coming in. This is something we have heard before. I'm not saying it's something we would take off the table. I'll tell you where I'm thinking about this now, and I would love to get more seller feedback going forward, especially as we're trying to ramp up these buyer abuse efforts that we're doing and getting rid of these buyers.

I think the world we ultimately get to is, sellers need to get to a place where they don't need to be worrying about this. It's the, eBay shouldn't be thinking about this as putting more tools in our sellers' hands to manage who buys from them and who doesn't. Not only does that introduce more complexity on the seller side in make sure this all gets set up, it introduces more complexity on the buyer side around when a buyer is being rejected from purchasing certain items and such.

But in a world where we can identify the bad buyers, in a world where we can see this abuse early on, and we can start rehabilitating or removing, and seeing these incidents and bad experiences going down, I am hoping we get to a world where sellers don't feel like they need this any more.

You know this, Ina, we can't do everything from a resource perspective on eBay. We're trying to figure out where to best put those resources. And a lot of it for me right now is making sure we're getting rid of the bad buyers on the site and changing policies with claims and such. Making sure we're getting the right pieces in place there. So this one on the list, I'm not sure where it falls on the priority.

Ina Steiner: We're running out of time and I want to thank you for chatting with us and I know you're holding a workshop this week. Do you want to talk about the workshop at all?

Rich Matsuura: We're having a seller protection workshop. We're going to go into a lot more details on what we talked about here. We're also going to be having a Q and A there. Thursday's workshop, it's unfortunately already filled up to the max so we started up another one, and I'll send you the information, but on January 9 we're going to have another one where we're going to cover the same thing.

Ina Steiner: When you say it's filled up, does that mean people can just observe it or they can't see it at all?


Rich Matsuura:
The company we work with has a technical limitation on how many people can call in and listen in. We'll keep on setting those up until that demand is not there. We want to make sure we're getting folks aware of what we're doing. So we'll be taking questions at the end. We'll keep sending them to you as they come up.

Ina Steiner: given the number of comments about this on the ECommerceBytes blog, I'm not surprised that the workshop filled up. I want to thank you so much for joining us, Rich, this was really informative.



Comments (53) | Leave Comment | Permalink
Readers Comments

Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: Patricia This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 14:47:02 2012
Sorry - I couldn't even finish the article...it reminded me so much of when Bill Cobb came aboard and said he would work on customer service...pfffttt!  and when Griff came on board professing to be the ''seller's advocate'' .....pffffttt!  Excuse me but I only see more of the same....I would be totally shocked if this turned out to be any different then the others.  Disillusioned?  You bet I am...after 14 years of this nonsense it gets pretty stale after awhile....which is probably why I finally have nothing listed on Ebay!
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: Patricia This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 14:49:05 2012
Sorry Ina - I know you people are trying to help.  I suggest Ebay put its money where its mouth is and start putting things into action instead of simply "talking" about then.  I know they've lost a LOT of good sellers and its probably finally starting to hurt BUT they'll keep losing them because they treat sellers likie crooks!!!...hence all this talk about "fixing" things!  phooey!
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: JOHNNY MASADA This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 15:23:45 2012
@ Patricia

"I know they've lost a LOT of good sellers"

    "its probably finally starting to hurt"

Whatever the behind the scenes ebay mentality, they need to think outside the box. NUMBERS are only numbers, they don't buy, they don't sell, numbers are the result of buyers and sellers interacting.

Without buyer / seller interaction

Those NUMBERS are BAD.

NUMBERS
Is it not fair to assume for every One good seller gone

That is 100 good buyers that seller takes.

Every seller is a buyer I can suppose, every seller certainly has family and friends who are buyers or would buy with promotion of an enthusiastic seller.

Word of Mouth RULES not NUMBERS
every seller felt slighted by ebay will certainly no longer be praising the joy of buying on ebay. They will most certainly be directing them to whatever venue they are now on.

Reputation is based on character whether in an individual or a Corporation.

It is a lose lose lose scenario for sellers then buyers and ebay.

Then who takes the cheese? Amazon

Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: RCL This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 15:42:27 2012
The man is not a seller, not a buyer, and appears to know very little at all about eBay transactions, except anecdotally. Thanks for the Herculean effort, Ina, to get silk from that pig's ear. They will run eBay into the ground.
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: rosachs This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 16:33:36 2012
The squeaking wheel finally gets a wee slap of grease... but the bigger question is, will the funds be committed to find and fix the source of the squeak?  Or is it just easier/cheaper to keep slathering out a dab of grease now and then to reduce the ''noise''?

I'll be waiting and watching, but I gave up holding my breathe a long time ago.
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
This user has validated their user name. by: Anonymous Annie
       
Wed Dec 12 16:44:08 2012
I listened to the interview. Very interesting. (Thank you Ina... thank you Mr. Matsuura!)

I'm glad that the speakerphone part of the interview only lasted 4 minutes, and that Mr. Matsuura picked up the handset for the remainder of the interview. :-)

He seems enthusiastic and sincere, and I'm willing to be open-minded and take him at his word. But don't interpret ''open-minded'' as my being optimistic or trusting.

I'll give him a chance... but the fact is that we've seen this type of effort before. In the past, we've seen from eBay a sudden burst of energy, and then the changes or initiatives are quickly forgotten, discontinued, or moved to the back-burner.

I'm glad Ina pressed him on how the low-score DSR's are being calculated. It's good to hear that it's based on total transactions and not as a percentage of DSR scores actually received. (Can any mathematically-inclinded individuals confirm that this method of calculation is indeed the equivalent of having received 5-star DSR's when no DSR's have actually been given?)

It was disappointing that Mr. Matsuura kind of side-stepped and avoided giving a direct and substantive response to Ina's question about DSR TRANSPARENCY. As Ina correctly pointed out, the ''retaliation'' factor has been eliminated (now that buyers can receive only positive feedback).

But I think the most important aspect of COMPLETE TRANSPARENCY is that buyers would be able to LEARN MORE about a particular transaction... or a particular product... or a specific distributor... or a specific shipping method, and make changes to improve if necessary.

In their current form, DSR's are only a tool to PUNISH. They have absolutely NO VALUE to sellers as a tool to IMPROVE. (It's little wonder that sellers resent them so much.)

I agree with others who have commented here that if eBay's newly-found interest in protecting sellers is a sincere one... it's something that should have been addressed LONG AGO, and that they are now having to deal with the consequences from a problem of their own making.

This suggests to me that the seller exodus has reached a tipping-point that's now showing up on their internal spreadsheets... and the figures can no longer be hidden or disguised.

It's pretty clear that eBay's motivation to take action at this particular moment is to protect their own interests. It's a pity that eBay's concern didn't come sooner... BEFORE the neglect and indifference had such a negative impact on so many sellers.

To me, this was very myopic to ignore these issues for as long as they did.

Some may optimistically respond ''better-late-than-never'' ... but I think the damage has been done, and for many, it's too late. Those sellers are gone for good, never to return. In the minds of many, eBay's reputation is forever tarnished.

It's easy to ruin a good reputation, but it's impossible to recover when so many people see eBay as a haven for unthrottled abuse from professional shoplifters.

Actions speak louder than words... so we'll just have to wait to see what actions there may be... and what the RESULTS and OUTCOME of those actions may be.  
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: JOHNNY MASADA This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 17:53:20 2012
@ Anonymous Annie


"In their current form, DSR's are only a tool to PUNISH. They have absolutely NO VALUE to sellers as a tool to IMPROVE"

The DSR issue, needs work.

It is great that ebay will reward it's top performing Athletes

but stop beating the other kids, the other kids with straight A's and perfect citizenship awards,{Feedback },


but can't go to Disneyland with the rest of the class because they could not run the minute mile.{ DSR scoring }

or worse yet,suspended or expelled for failing to run that one minute mile,

DSR Punitive Fallout 1 2 3 you're out.

Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: Mercy the Mingless This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 17:59:04 2012
Ahhhh....

Once again with the great and powerful ''algorithm'' that will save us all.

Same panacea that has been promised numerous times over the years yet it gets worse and worse for the remaining small sellers.
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
by: happyharry This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 18:15:30 2012
basically in 1 line ...we still control the sellers , drink more Kool Aid , nothing is going to change
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
This user has validated their user name. by: iheartjacksparrow
       
Wed Dec 12 18:22:34 2012
Annie says: "This suggests to me that the seller exodus has reached a tipping-point that's now showing up on their internal spreadsheets... and the figures can no longer be hidden or disguised."

That's basically what I stated in the other thread. Ever since JD took over it's been all about the buyer, the buyer, the buyer. There were no bad buyers, only bad sellers (hence the reason for removing the ability for sellers to leave negative feedback). Now, suddenly, Rich is admitting there might be some bad buyers? That not all buyers are innocent little lambs, terrified of being "slaughtered" by the evil sellers? That some buyers might be guilty of fraud (hence the two mentions of a "brick in a box")? Yeah, something has definitely changed.
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by: happyharry This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 19:14:25 2012
People like this are idiotic as they know nothing of the business that the work in?

Just answer this One simple question:
How is it possible for any seller with over 3,000 FB with high DSRs to be suspended from listing for 5 weeks for bad buyer experience when they receive 2 (yes only 2 ever) Negative FB from new International buyers.

Now heres the twist….BOTH Negs were mutually removed, but I was still locked out from selling 3 weeks longer; the account was usable from yesterday only problem ….Now we have a listing limit???
Ebay is clueless

Also why are sellers responsible for delivery times when items are shown to be delivered by the post office NOT Couriers
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This user has validated their user name. by: Anonymous Annie
       
Wed Dec 12 19:14:50 2012
IheartJackSparrow observes: -- ''Ever since JD took over it's been all about the buyer, the buyer, the buyer. There were no bad buyers, only bad sellers (hence the reason for removing the ability for sellers to leave negative feedback).''

I imagine that early-on, their thought-process must have included the notion that having strict standards for sellers (with harsh penalties) would weed-out the undesirable sellers. -- And I'll admit that there were undesirable sellers.

But they appear to have made a mistake with their philosophy of ''if a little is good, then a lot is better''. eBay execs and policy-makers assumed that their hostile and anti-seller policies would guarantee that marginal-to-middlin sellers would leave (or improve) and that the cream would rise to the top... that eBay would be filled-to-the-brim and bursting-at-the-seams with these fine outstanding sellers.

Their policies and actions have obviously backfired. Even the very best sellers could see what was happening around them. Even if it wasn't happening *directly* to them, they could see the effects of eBay hostility on their friends, fellow sellers, and favorite sellers.

Those desirable sellers were all too aware that what they've been observing happening all around them could very easily be THEIR OWN FATE as well!

I'm convinced that many of the best sellers (who as of yet had been relatively unscathed by eBay hostility) decided to take preemptive action and get the hell outta Dodge before they, too, awakened one morning to find that their livelihood had been disrupted.

I rely on my online sales as supplemental income... it helps to make ends meet and we can put-away a little bit here and there for a vacation or as a Christmas fund. --- Others rely on eBay as their MAIN SOURCE OF INCOME!! It's all they've got! And it absolutely breaks my heart to see how they've been treated. Cast aside and discarded as casually as yesterday's newspaper.

Ill-conceived plans, poor programming, constant glitches, hidden listings, rolling-blackouts, careless disregard for honest hard-working sellers, coddling the shoplifters, poor employee training, inconsistent rules enforcement... are all a recipe for disaster.

The chickens have come home to roost.
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by: COH This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 19:22:07 2012
Wow - I need hip waders to get through all that BS.  It always amazes me how someone can talk so much and say absolutely NOTHING.  We're looking a that, we never hear that, wait until next year, blah blah blah.

SPIN OFF THE COLLECTIBLES TO IT'S OWN SITE!  Let the big boxes and chinese sellers have their OWN ebay, and let the small collectible sellers have theirs.
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by: COH This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 19:25:22 2012
HEY MATSUURA - how about reading the DISCUSSION BOARDS!!?!?!  THAT is where you will find you information.  Now that NO ONE can get to them to complain - of course all will be rosy in ebayworld.  OH - and another thing - the "Tell Us What You THink" link is BROKEN, too!  BUT - I did get your email survey about recommending sellers to Ebay and it appears someone is listening to the beaten-down sellers FINALLY.  I hope you liked my comments, cause I took the survey oh yes I did.  Or was it just pablum all over again?
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by: COH This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 19:28:26 2012
ANNON ANNIE!  You hit the nail on the head in you last paragraph!  I complain about those SAME issues in their little email survey - AND the pages and pages of unsolds since Oct. 15!  If you get the 'invitation' - take the survey and tell them how you REALLY feel.  And that includes EVERYONE!
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This user has validated their user name. by: Ed Gadfly
       Web Site
Wed Dec 12 19:47:27 2012
''We have a trust science team at eBay, a whole bunch of really smart guys, PhDs, and these guys create these algorithms. These guys are looking at every transaction that happens on the site. They're looking at buyers' histories.''

Ohhh... PhDs. Can't do anything about shill bidders though can they?

eBa'al is a cesspool. Who in their right mind shops in a cesspool?

Rich Matsuura is another shill, following the likes of Uncle Griff and the other pimps who tout eBa'al as the answer to the eCommerce dreams of desperate people, selling their treasures to make ends meet.

eBa'al is the most nauseating place in the Internet. Let's have some more of the Social Media Sellers lead the sad seller lambs to the slaughter.

People ought to be ashamed and then prosecuted for fraud.
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by: Brainiac jones This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 19:53:07 2012
sigh and double sigh

I have been beaten down by ebay long enough that I, quite frankly, my dear, no longer give a damn. Maybe this guy will effect change, though my suspicion he is simply a flack who will appear to be listening but either do nothing or be incapable of doing anything...for whatever reasons.

eBay sent me a self-described 20 minute survey in the mail a couple of days ago. A chance for a $1000 credit? One chance in a thousand...? To lose 20 minutes of my life for the chance to bitch and moan...again...to people who never seem to listen?

I'd rather play Where's My Water? for twenny minutes...I feel toward eBay just the way I feel toward our congress...
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
This user has validated their user name. by: elpereles
       Web Site
Wed Dec 12 20:37:49 2012
A lot of promises. Just remember me the politicians here in Puerto Rico. Now ask me if they do something to improve.  

I believe the DSR is good tool, but not implemented in the correct way. Like others said it is use as a punishment tool.  
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by: fordat1 This user has validated their user name.
       
Wed Dec 12 20:51:19 2012
Either he is a trusting fool or flat our liar.

Either way, eBay doesn't give a good god damn about small sellers, we are just ''Noise'' that needs to be used,abused  and drained like a Vampire would a Virgin...

Ina, thank you for taking the time to do this interview, but sadly the subject clearly has never sold on eBay and was well rehearsed in the company talking points and ''eBay'' double-talk.

Whatever the case, it just proves they are the same scum they have been for years.

Tis the season to be Jolly.....

But not if you are selling on eBay.
Perminate Link for What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript   What eBay Is Doing to Protect Sellers from Bad Buyers-Transcript
This user has validated their user name. by: Sandymenu
       
Wed Dec 12 21:18:46 2012
Ina: Thank you!

The solution for both parties (buyers and sellers) would be to do away with Neutral & Negative Feedback from buyers.

If sellers no longer are allowed to rate bad buyers then nor should buyers.

How? Buyers that experienced a POSITIVE outcome can/should use the only option: Positive feed.

After requiring the buyer to contact the seller through the member to member communication, if buyer still feels negatively neutral in disagreement then ''Leave NO feedback'' would be their only choice. Since there are already plenty of buyers that do not leave feedback (in general) then why allow a bad remark when it can easily be a Positive outcome for BOTH parties?

Give buyer only a POSITIVE feedback button to select.

This way, eBay can do away with BAD ratings.

I know if that were ''my option'' as a buyer and I was not please after contacting the seller, then I would not even opt' to give seller a Positive. And since a Neut-Neg is not available then I just move on.

It's an easy fixer. eBay just needs to want to ''fix it''.
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